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One of the most common things Resource Generation (RG) members are looking for is a financial advisor who respects or is in line with their values, who understands social change and progressive financial values, and can give trusted guidance accordingly.

Close colleagues at a trusted progressive financial firm, along with several RG members, have developed a survey for financial advisors to fill out about their values, their work with young people, experience and expertise with impact investing, diversity of their company’s leadership, and other questions to help figure out if their work matches your values. Their answers are compiled below.

The Compact for Racial Justice is a proactive agenda for fairness and unity in our communities, politics, the
economy and the law. It offers concrete strategies and proposals to reverse racial disparities and move our society
towards full equity, inclusion and dignity for all people. The Compact transcends talk of personal prejudice
with compelling evidence of institutional racism and realistic proactive solutions. It seeks to engage a broad
multiracial base of activists, opinion leaders and policymakers in making government and powerful institutions
accountable for eliminating racial inequality

The resources in this section are compiled from several sources including:
Changemakers, KLD Research & Analytics, Liberty Hill Foundation, Sharon Rich, and
Stephen Viederman.

This workbook, and the dismantling
racism process, are offered in
memory and celebration of the life
and work of the late Kenneth
Jackson Jones (1950-2004). Kenneth
was a visionary and a leader, an
organizer and a teacher, our friend
and colleague. The dismantling
racism process was developed with
his leadership. We believe that its
value in the lives of so many people
and organizations is a
demonstration and celebration of
Kenneth’s enormous contribution to
our continued struggle to realize our
vision of a just world.

Race Files exists to take complex constructs about race and make them understandable. We use analogy, pop culture and personal narrative to create a language for the daily experience of dealing with racism that helps us to name our daily experiences of race and racism, and invites cross-racial solidarity.

“Moving the Race Conversation Forward” is a report by Race Forward: The Center for Racial Justice Innovation that aims to reshape and reform the way we talk about race and racism in our country.

Design and facilitate the challenging conversations that catalyze breakthrough thinking and lasting agreements

Are you looking for new ways to help people who are different from one another talk about racism and then figure out what to do together? Have you ever been leading a group and been stopped in your tracks by someone’s comment or question?

Trial in the federal class action lawsuit on the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk policy,Floyd, et al. v. City of New York, et al, begins on March 18. At stake is whether the controversial tactic is a racial profiling practice, which violates civil and constitutional rights. Filed by four plaintiffs who were stopped and frisked, the suit represents the entire class of people who have been racially profiled.

But racial profiling is not only a danger to a person’s legal rights, which guarantee equal protection under the law. It is also a danger to their health.

Students begin to experience the effects of classism in schools as early as kindergarten, or perhaps even nursery school. Elementary school playgrounds reveal the effects of classism on a child’s education. Families living in poverty and even working-class families cannot readily afford the latest toy or gadget that might be all the rage on the playground. When all the other kids are excitedly exploring the newest electronic recreational device, the kid who is without feels excluded and somehow “less than” the others. Sadly, that child cannot possibly grasp that this awful feeling of inferiority is caused by classism. My Story…

Racism in the Criminal Justice System – An infographic by the team at ArrestRecords.com

Class Action inspires action to end classism and extreme inequality by providing change-makers with tools, training and inspiration to raise awareness, shift cultural beliefs about social class, build cross-class solidarity, and transform institutions and systems.

​Dismantling Racism Works (dRworks) is no longer offering
workshops and race equity consulting (see About dRworks page).
We are pleased to offer our workbook. We hope you find the material here useful
to you, your organization, and your community.

​This web-based workbook was originally designed to support the Dismantling Racism Works 2-day basic workshop.
The workbook is now offered as a resource to the community.
If you would, please continue to credit dRworks if and when you use our material. Thank you.
This web-based workbook is resource dense, so for best results, use a computer to view and use it.

NCRP promotes philanthropy that serves the public good, is responsive to people and communities with the least wealth and opportunity, and is held accountable to the highest standards of integrity and openness.

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE RACIAL JUSTICE A REALITY
Race Forward defines racial justice as the systematic fair treatment of people of all races that results in equal opportunities and outcomes for everyone. Join us—help to make racial justice a reality by donating to Race Forward!

United for a Fair Economy challenges the concentration of wealth and power that corrupts democracy, deepens the racial divide and tears communities apart. We use popular economics education, trainings, and creative communications to support social movements working for a resilient, sustainable and equitable economy.

Wealth for the Common Good is a network of business leaders, high-income individuals and partners working together to promote shared prosperity and fair taxation. We are “the 1 percent” that wants an economy that works for everyone. Our membership includes entrepreneurs, doctors, lawyers, school teachers, engineers and elected officials of all backgrounds and from all over the country.

Based in the Pacific Northwest and Mountain States, Western States Center works nationwide to strengthen inclusive democracy

This tool is a starting point. This sampling of questions is designed to help you examine where your foundation is right now on its journey towards social justice philanthropy. This assessment is intended to help you think about where you want to go and what steps you can take.

Want more direction in your path towards social change? Let this document be your compass

This list of ways to take action is for those who have wealth, class privilege, or a desire to work towards a world where wealth, land, and power are shared

The following list isn’t comprehensive, but will help you think broadly and boldly. Challenge yourself to find five new actions you’d like to add to your life. Or choose a new one each month. Just keep it moving.

You are not imagining it – the field of philanthropy is full of lingo and acronyms
and tax-related terms. We have compiled this glossary from definitions provided
by the Donors Forum of Chicago, The Foundation Center and included a few of our
own. We tried to pull out the main ones that you will run into.

A Giving Community is a peer network of donors generally formed around some shared identity or interest. Giving Communities offer members opportunities for education, community building and peer support. Because of the power dynamics and norms of silence about money, many donors report feeling isolated and alone as they consider their philanthropy – a Giving Community offers a space for donors to move past this isolation and find the support and learning that will help them become engaged and effective givers. 
Click Here
 to browse all of our
participating Giving Communities

Social justice philanthropy focuses on the root causes of social, economic and environmental injustices. It strives to include the people who are impacted by those injustices as decision-makers and leaders. It also aims to make the field of philanthropy more accessible and diverse. In social justice philanthropy, foundations are accountable, transparent and responsive in their grantmaking. Donors and foundations act as allies to social justice movements by contributing not only monetary resources but their time, knowledge, skills and access. Social justice philanthropy is also sometimes called social change philanthropy, social movement philanthropy, and community-based philanthropy.*

Social justice philanthropy focuses on the root causes of social, racial, economic and environmental injustices.

It strives to include the people who are impacted by those injustices as decision-makers. It also aims to make the field of philanthropy more accessible and diverse. In social justice philanthropy, foundations are accountable, transparent and responsive in their grantmaking. Donors and foundations act as allies to social justice movements by contributing not only monetary resources but their time, knowledge, skills and access. Social justice philanthropy is also sometimes called social change philanthropy, social movement philanthropy, and community-based philanthropy.

Class is a system of power based on perceived social and economic status. While closely connected, class and money are not the same thing. The class we are raised in strongly shapes our values, beliefs, and expectations. These imprints deeply inform our ways of thinking and acting throughout life. For most people, the class we are raised in is the primary determining factor of what economic bracket we will stay within. While income level often comes with many of the class patterns and cultures associated with it, this isn’t always true. For this reason, classed experiences are separated from hard numbers below.

One of the most powerful things we can do right now is invest inthe organizations that are fighting for love and justice. For thoseof us with access to wealth, this is the moment to
thoughtfullyand boldly leverage our resources
 to fund movements resistingthe policies and governance that appeal to bigotry and fear tobenefit the wealthy.

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One of the most common things Resource Generation (RG) members are looking for is a financial advisor who respects or is in line with their values, who understands social change and progressive financial values, and can give trusted guidance accordingly.

Close colleagues at a trusted progressive financial firm, along with several RG members, have developed a survey for financial advisors to fill out about their values, their work with young people, experience and expertise with impact investing, diversity of their company’s leadership, and other questions to help figure out if their work matches your values. Their answers are compiled below.

The Compact for Racial Justice is a proactive agenda for fairness and unity in our communities, politics, the
economy and the law. It offers concrete strategies and proposals to reverse racial disparities and move our society
towards full equity, inclusion and dignity for all people. The Compact transcends talk of personal prejudice
with compelling evidence of institutional racism and realistic proactive solutions. It seeks to engage a broad
multiracial base of activists, opinion leaders and policymakers in making government and powerful institutions
accountable for eliminating racial inequality

The resources in this section are compiled from several sources including:
Changemakers, KLD Research & Analytics, Liberty Hill Foundation, Sharon Rich, and
Stephen Viederman.

This workbook, and the dismantling
racism process, are offered in
memory and celebration of the life
and work of the late Kenneth
Jackson Jones (1950-2004). Kenneth
was a visionary and a leader, an
organizer and a teacher, our friend
and colleague. The dismantling
racism process was developed with
his leadership. We believe that its
value in the lives of so many people
and organizations is a
demonstration and celebration of
Kenneth’s enormous contribution to
our continued struggle to realize our
vision of a just world.

Race Files exists to take complex constructs about race and make them understandable. We use analogy, pop culture and personal narrative to create a language for the daily experience of dealing with racism that helps us to name our daily experiences of race and racism, and invites cross-racial solidarity.

“Moving the Race Conversation Forward” is a report by Race Forward: The Center for Racial Justice Innovation that aims to reshape and reform the way we talk about race and racism in our country.

Design and facilitate the challenging conversations that catalyze breakthrough thinking and lasting agreements

Are you looking for new ways to help people who are different from one another talk about racism and then figure out what to do together? Have you ever been leading a group and been stopped in your tracks by someone’s comment or question?

Trial in the federal class action lawsuit on the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk policy,Floyd, et al. v. City of New York, et al, begins on March 18. At stake is whether the controversial tactic is a racial profiling practice, which violates civil and constitutional rights. Filed by four plaintiffs who were stopped and frisked, the suit represents the entire class of people who have been racially profiled.

But racial profiling is not only a danger to a person’s legal rights, which guarantee equal protection under the law. It is also a danger to their health.

Students begin to experience the effects of classism in schools as early as kindergarten, or perhaps even nursery school. Elementary school playgrounds reveal the effects of classism on a child’s education. Families living in poverty and even working-class families cannot readily afford the latest toy or gadget that might be all the rage on the playground. When all the other kids are excitedly exploring the newest electronic recreational device, the kid who is without feels excluded and somehow “less than” the others. Sadly, that child cannot possibly grasp that this awful feeling of inferiority is caused by classism. My Story…

Racism in the Criminal Justice System – An infographic by the team at ArrestRecords.com

Class Action inspires action to end classism and extreme inequality by providing change-makers with tools, training and inspiration to raise awareness, shift cultural beliefs about social class, build cross-class solidarity, and transform institutions and systems.

​Dismantling Racism Works (dRworks) is no longer offering
workshops and race equity consulting (see About dRworks page).
We are pleased to offer our workbook. We hope you find the material here useful
to you, your organization, and your community.

​This web-based workbook was originally designed to support the Dismantling Racism Works 2-day basic workshop.
The workbook is now offered as a resource to the community.
If you would, please continue to credit dRworks if and when you use our material. Thank you.
This web-based workbook is resource dense, so for best results, use a computer to view and use it.

NCRP promotes philanthropy that serves the public good, is responsive to people and communities with the least wealth and opportunity, and is held accountable to the highest standards of integrity and openness.

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE RACIAL JUSTICE A REALITY
Race Forward defines racial justice as the systematic fair treatment of people of all races that results in equal opportunities and outcomes for everyone. Join us—help to make racial justice a reality by donating to Race Forward!

United for a Fair Economy challenges the concentration of wealth and power that corrupts democracy, deepens the racial divide and tears communities apart. We use popular economics education, trainings, and creative communications to support social movements working for a resilient, sustainable and equitable economy.

Wealth for the Common Good is a network of business leaders, high-income individuals and partners working together to promote shared prosperity and fair taxation. We are “the 1 percent” that wants an economy that works for everyone. Our membership includes entrepreneurs, doctors, lawyers, school teachers, engineers and elected officials of all backgrounds and from all over the country.

Based in the Pacific Northwest and Mountain States, Western States Center works nationwide to strengthen inclusive democracy

This tool is a starting point. This sampling of questions is designed to help you examine where your foundation is right now on its journey towards social justice philanthropy. This assessment is intended to help you think about where you want to go and what steps you can take.

Want more direction in your path towards social change? Let this document be your compass

This list of ways to take action is for those who have wealth, class privilege, or a desire to work towards a world where wealth, land, and power are shared

The following list isn’t comprehensive, but will help you think broadly and boldly. Challenge yourself to find five new actions you’d like to add to your life. Or choose a new one each month. Just keep it moving.

You are not imagining it – the field of philanthropy is full of lingo and acronyms
and tax-related terms. We have compiled this glossary from definitions provided
by the Donors Forum of Chicago, The Foundation Center and included a few of our
own. We tried to pull out the main ones that you will run into.

A Giving Community is a peer network of donors generally formed around some shared identity or interest. Giving Communities offer members opportunities for education, community building and peer support. Because of the power dynamics and norms of silence about money, many donors report feeling isolated and alone as they consider their philanthropy – a Giving Community offers a space for donors to move past this isolation and find the support and learning that will help them become engaged and effective givers. 
Click Here
 to browse all of our
participating Giving Communities

Social justice philanthropy focuses on the root causes of social, economic and environmental injustices. It strives to include the people who are impacted by those injustices as decision-makers and leaders. It also aims to make the field of philanthropy more accessible and diverse. In social justice philanthropy, foundations are accountable, transparent and responsive in their grantmaking. Donors and foundations act as allies to social justice movements by contributing not only monetary resources but their time, knowledge, skills and access. Social justice philanthropy is also sometimes called social change philanthropy, social movement philanthropy, and community-based philanthropy.*

Social justice philanthropy focuses on the root causes of social, racial, economic and environmental injustices.

It strives to include the people who are impacted by those injustices as decision-makers. It also aims to make the field of philanthropy more accessible and diverse. In social justice philanthropy, foundations are accountable, transparent and responsive in their grantmaking. Donors and foundations act as allies to social justice movements by contributing not only monetary resources but their time, knowledge, skills and access. Social justice philanthropy is also sometimes called social change philanthropy, social movement philanthropy, and community-based philanthropy.

Class is a system of power based on perceived social and economic status. While closely connected, class and money are not the same thing. The class we are raised in strongly shapes our values, beliefs, and expectations. These imprints deeply inform our ways of thinking and acting throughout life. For most people, the class we are raised in is the primary determining factor of what economic bracket we will stay within. While income level often comes with many of the class patterns and cultures associated with it, this isn’t always true. For this reason, classed experiences are separated from hard numbers below.

One of the most powerful things we can do right now is invest inthe organizations that are fighting for love and justice. For thoseof us with access to wealth, this is the moment to
thoughtfullyand boldly leverage our resources
 to fund movements resistingthe policies and governance that appeal to bigotry and fear tobenefit the wealthy.

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Interested in Resource Generation? Want to get involved? Stay connected?  Please take a minute to fill out this form: it will help us connect you to our work and keep you up to date on events, resources, and opportunities across the country!